Agreement Between 2 States

In the United States, an intergovernmental pact is a pact or agreement between two or more states or between states and a foreign government. The compact clause (Article I, Section 10, Clause 3) of the United States Constitution provides that „no state ,… Make an agreement or pact with another state or with a foreign power ,…“[1] While historical intergovernmental pacts included only states as parties, the federal government has recently participated in some pacts. [73] Indeed, some Pacts require a representative of the federal government to participate in compact governance. For example, the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and the Compact Tunnel require that a member of the 13-member board of directors governing the pact be appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, as noted above. [74] Some pacts have been implemented by Congress under federal law and provide for direct federal involvement in matters involved in the pact, such as the Interstate Agreement on Detainers,[75] which applies to the transfer of prisoners convicted of independent trials. Intergovernmental pacts are different from the Uniform Acts, which are standard statutes established by non-governmental legal experts, which must be adopted independently by state legislators, rather than forming an agreement between several states. Depending on the purpose of an intergovernmental pact, it may provide rules and procedures for future actions to promote the objectives of the pact. For example, compacts designed to create interstate boundaries, such as the Missouri-Nebraska Boundary Compact,[43] cannot contain procedures for ongoing Covenant activities.

This pact first provides for the adjustment of the border between the two states and related issues, such as the definition of the transgression of state sovereignty over territories that have become members of the other state as a result of border adjustment, and the right to impose real estate located in acquired territory. [44] As a treaty, an intergovernmental pact primarily concerns the rights and obligations of states that have chosen to become contracting parties and their respective citizens, since the pact is promulgated by their respective legislators. However, some compacts go so far as to target the effect (if any) of this pact on states that are not contracting parties. A pact may contain provisions that stipulate that the pact does not affect other agreements that the parties may enter into with non-partisan states. [26] Alternatively, a pact can define how non-compressant states can participate in pact-related activities. [27] For example, the Interstate Pest Control Compact (which is no longer in force) provided that the pact`s board of directors or its executive committee could not spend funds from an insurance fund created by the pact in a non-condensed state, unless it was justified by the conditions in that state and the benefits to the contracting states of the Covenant. , and that it cannot impose conditions for such expenditures. [28] After negotiation, intergovernmental pacts must be approved by legislators in your affiliated states. [10] A pact is approved by a state legislator in accordance with its procedure for enacting legislation and becomes the status of the state. [11] If approved by the legislature, the governor of a state still has the power to veto a pact if the governor so decides (subject to the legislature`s ability to strike a veto by a new vote). [12] Representatives of states negotiating a pact are well advised to ensure that their respective legislators are informed of the progress of negotiations and the resolution of issues and are familiar with them; Otherwise, a legislator may refuse to approve a pact as presented and request a renegotiation of questions before its approval is granted.

[13] A compact for which much information is available online is the Multistate Tax Compact, which came into effect in 1967.

08. April 2021 von admin
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